Butt-kicking, but whose?

Published in the Globe and Mail, June 10 2010:

Re Searching for an ass to kick (editorial, June 9):  Perhaps we should implement the precautionary principle - institute a policy of reverse onus and kick our collective asses.    

Anne Mitchell, Toronto

 

Ursula Franklin on Scrupling

Want to hear Ursula Franklin on scrupling - an old Quaker practice used in discussing difficult issues of the time such as paying taxes for wars and slaveholding.   Quakers in Toronto recently experimented on scrupling on the erosion of democracy in Canada.    You can hear Ursula's views on the CBC's The Current at http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/2010/05/may-06-2010.html

The Oil Disaster: When Will We Ever Learn?

Once again profit and greed - and our lust for oil - has backfired.  We are facing a huge ecological and social disaster.  Once again the precautionary principle was not followed.  It is also time for us to insist on reverse onus - where the industry initiating the project has to ensure - in an open and transparent way - that the initiative can be carried out safely and that there are plans in place should there be an accident.   When will we learn that enough is enough?  If we ever get out of this mess - and reaffirm that sustainability is a goa

Planning for a Sustainable Future: A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada

The Federal Government has published this document to encourage Canadians to respond and provide their views, thoughts, and opinions on Canada's draft Sustainable Development Strategy.   The Federal Government asks Canadians to respond by July 12 to sdo-bdd@ec.gc.ca   In 2002 at the World Summit on Sustainable Development held in Johannesburg, South Africa, Canada along with all other countries, committed to develop a Sustainable Development strategy for the country by 2005.    Last year, the Government passed the Fede

SERONICA

  http://www.seroindia.org/Seronica.html   This is the website for a new e-journal.  I have an article in the first edition on whether or not GMOs can reduce poverty.

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